Category: Less-Lethal Classes

Pepper Spray

This class covers the use of pepper spray for civilian self defense. Not every defensive problem warrants a lethal response (guns, knives, etc.) and OC/pepper spray can be a good option for people who want a non-lethal/less-lethal* tool available or for those who live in areas where firearm concealed carry permits are generally unavailable.

Self defense topics (with thanks to Rory Miller)
The legal and ethical aspects of force

Violence and crime dynamics

Avoidance and de-escalation

Breaking the freeze

The fight itself

The medical, legal and emotional aftermath

Pepper spray-specific topics
Safety orientation
What pepper spray is and does
What it isn’t and doesn’t do
Carry options
Deployment & environmental factors
Contamination risks & decontamination
Practice shots with inert training canisters, in different environments if the facility allows

* We use the term “non-lethal” as defined by the United States Department of Defense – which does not mean the weapon cannot cause death, but that it is not intended to be fatal, and in most cases is not. Non-lethal weapons are defined as “weapons that are explicitly designed and primarily employed so as to incapacitate personnel or material, while minimizing fatalities, permanent injury to personnel, and undesired damage to property and the environment.”

TASER

This class covers the use of the TASER® Bolt (formerly known as the model C2) for civilian self defense. Not every defensive problem warrants a lethal force response and the TASER is an excellent option for people who want a non-lethal* option available or for those who live in areas where firearm concealed carry permits aren’t generally available.

One of the benefits of TASERs is that the company will replace your unit for the cost of shipping if you lose it in a self defense encounter, making it a relatively affordable choice. Another is that while being tased is painful, it typically causes almost no actual injury—about as much as getting two fishhooks stuck in your finger.

Self defense topics (with thanks to Rory Miller)
The legal and ethical aspects of force

Violence and crime dynamics

Avoidance and de-escalation

Breaking the freeze

The fight itself

The medical, legal and emotional aftermath

TASER-specific topics
Safety orientation
What the TASER is and does
What it isn’t and doesn’t do
Parts, operation, and maintenance
Legal requirements
Carry options
Deployment
Practice shot

You will NOT get tased in this class! While law enforcement and some security officer training requires students to be on the receiving end of a TASER, civilian courses do not require or allow this.

If you need to buy a TASER, use this link to get 20% off.

Reference materials from TASER International (all PDFs, links provided for informational purposes only—these do not constitute legal advice):
State Statute Quick Summary Chart
State Statute Chart
TASER Device Liability & Litigation Risk

* TASER International uses the term “non-lethal” as defined by the United States Department of Defense – which does not mean the weapon cannot cause death, but that it is not intended to be fatal, and in most cases is not. Non-lethal weapons are defined as “weapons that are explicitly designed and primarily employed so as to incapacitate personnel or material, while minimizing fatalities, permanent injury to personnel, and undesired damage to property and the environment.”

TASER® is a registered trademark of TASER International, Inc., registered in the U.S. All rights reserved.